What’s With the Weird Hats?

Monet Sporting a Beret

Monet Sporting a Beret

Rembrandt in a Beret

Rembrandt in a Beret

Help me rescue the poor stereotyped artist from the beret.  Last week I asked on my Facebook Page, “When you meet an artist or see their work, what would you most like to know, but perhaps find yourself not asking?”. An unexpected but very good question came from one of my friends: “What’s with all the weird hats?”  I realized that I had no idea, but that it would be a good topic to research. So, here we go into a light history of the beret.  Continue reading

Gallery Survival Guide

So you think you might be attending your first gallery opening, and you’re not quite sure what to expect? Wipe the sweat from your forehead, get a tissue for your clammy hands, and breathe a deep sign of relief for I am here to help you.

Romanticizing, detail ©Karin Jurick

Romanticizing, detail ©Karin Jurick

Yes, sometimes when we think about going to a gallery it feels intimidating. We don’t know enough big words about art, don’t know much about art history and we feel the pressure to come up with all the right observations and opinions when it’s time to make conversation.

But I don’t think you will find these expectations at most galleries.

Blue Blood Denim, detail ©Karin Jurick

Blue Blood Denim, detail ©Karin Jurick

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As you prepare for your excursion, here is a glimpse of the atmosphere you can expect to find at most gallery openings:

Its Subjective, detail ©Karin Jurick

Its Subjective, detail ©Karin Jurick

• A large group of people moving around a room viewing art.

• An open house structure in which you may arrive at any time and leave when you wish

• Sometimes there is live music.

• Light refreshments are usually served.

• You may see the gallery director making guests comfortable and being available for any questions or sales.

• The artists will usually be present and the well known ones will probably be in a perpetual conversation.

You will find people who genuinely love art, love to create it and love to talk about it. That’s where you come in. You don’t have to know a lot and you certainly don’t have to put on a front of art history knowledge. Art is meant to be enjoyed, discussed and felt. And if you’re new to this, there’s no shame at all. You just need to observe, ask any questions you have, form your opinions, and enjoy.

As an introvert, I appreciate getting questions of all sorts to help me get talking. No question is silly and I love talking about the process so ask away!

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Federal Case, detail ©Karin Jurick

Federal Case, detail ©Karin Jurick

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There are a few common sense rules that I will list here, but I’ll try not to give you too many because the goal is for you to enjoy yourself.

Gallery Etiquette:

  • Dress: Somewhere in the middle of jeans and a T-shirt and a suit and tie is the appropriate dress for most galleries. You don’t have to be fancy, just don’t be slovenly.
  • Be considerate of your phone use. You might want to take phone calls outside. It may be encouraged to take pictures of friends and perhaps with an artist, especially if you plan to post pictures on social media bringing attention to the gallery. When in doubt you can always ask.
  • Enjoy some art and then the snackies.
  • Please respect the paintings, sculpture, and glass by keeping a reasonable distance. It’s best not to touch or get too close to art that you don’t own. If you want to lean in and look at a detail, that’s understandable.
  • Consider refraining from making negative comments on a work of art to your friends because the artist, their friends or family could be in earshot. Share your critical comments over dessert or during the ride home.~
Starry Eyed, detail ©Karin Jurick

Starry Eyed, detail ©Karin Jurick

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If you’re still apprehensive, here are some tips to help you enjoy your visit to a gallery:
  • Step in and take in the whole space, noting the flow of traffic and the direction you would like to proceed.
  • Begin observing the art. Making note of how you feel about the artwork. Do you like it? Why or why not? See if you can find something positive to say.
  • See if you can find out something about the artist. There are usually statements or bios nearby.
  • Hunt for at least one piece of art that you like the most. Or, if it’s a group show, figure out who your favorite artist is.
  • Hypothetically, If you could buy a painting which painting would it be?
  • Do you have questions about how the art is created? The subject matter? If you feel up to it, ask the director if they can point the artist out to you so you can ask your questions. Again, artists love to talk about their craft.  Don’t be afraid or intimidated.
Be sure to enjoy the atmosphere, the food, opportunity to learn something about art, the live music, and above all else enjoy seeing beauty.
Beautify your life!

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Dance Hall ©Karin Jurick

Dance Hall ©Karin Jurick

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I hope this little lesson will help you as you venture out into the art world. As far as I’m concerned art appreciation can be as simple as enjoying something that you’re seeing. If you don’t have plans to attend a gallery opening, then make some. It makes for a great date night accessory in the middle of dinner and dessert. Bring some friends and talk about the show over something drippy and chocolatey.

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Want more?

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Want more of Karin’s gorgeous paintings?

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Go Fish – a little store of global proportions

My husband and I have been in Atlanta, GA this week for some meetings. Today we decided to go out and have some fun: see some sights, munch on some food, annoy some strangers. . . Unfortunately the Georgia Aquarium would be closing soon after we could arrive, so we ended up at Marietta Square. We found it to be a sweet little block of unique gift shops with very cute and interesting items all wrapping around a small park. Very cute. Very quaint. It’s the sort of place that gets me all inspired and ready to paint when I get home.

Then we happened upon this little shop
and I decided that I just had to tell you about this gem.

Go Fish Logo

Go Fish Store

What is so special about this store? Everything in it is handmade and created by artisans living in 3rd world developing countries. Images of the artisans in their homes are posted beside their work and you can read their story. Beautiful jewelry, handmade clothes, scarves, wood carvings and so much more one of a kind pieces can be found here. Go Fish eliminates the middle man by working directly with the artists themselves and pays them their asking prices and I can’t honestly imagine that there’s an unjust markup as much of the merchandise is reasonably priced.

Marietta Square

Marietta Square

The current location page shows 12 stores from Virginia on down to Florida with many franchise openings available in selected locations. So, if you’re into beautiful handmade items, helping someone in need, or think you might want to go into business – think Go Fish!

“Therefore,
as we have the opportunity,
let us do good to all people.”
Galatians 6:10